Top 10 Tweets from The ACC Annual Meeting 2017

The swamp of legal apathy was well and truly drained in Washington DC as the largest gathering of in-house lawyers assembled in the U.S capital. More than 4000 in-house counsel attended the ACC Annual Meeting (14-18 October 2017) to debate the hottest trends, innovations in the law, and future of the profession. Twitter, as always, was there to capture the debate. The Washington Twitterstorm covered everything from blockchain, to Legal Operations, access to justice, and who exactly has the best swag? Here we reveal the top 10 Tweets from the conference.

1. Law and the Blockchain Revolution

Don Tapscott, bestselling author of the Blockchain Revolution, began the conference which served to establish a tech focus. Ron Friedmann, Partner at Fireman & Company noted : “#ACCAM17 seems ahead of law firm counterparts in putting #blockchain front and center.” Tapscott explained that corporate counsel needs to keep blockchain on their radar.

Ilona Korzha, in-house counsel for Fortune 100 company, Sprint, noted: “Fantastic and thought-provoking presentation. Who knew that blockchain was so much more than just currency?” Mark Schwarz Vice President & General Counsel at Teletrac Navman, added: “Blockchain is everywhere… legal challenges and opportunities abound.”

2. The rise of Legal Operations 

To make Law Great Again, the ACC prescribed Legal Operations (26% of general counsel have legal operations functions, up from 16% in 2016). “Of all the wonderful sessns/great thinkg at this meetg, THIS may have the most long-term impact” tweeted Susan Hackett, CEO of Legal Executive Leadership, amd former GC for the ACC. The session was led by Reese Arrowsmith, Vice President, Head of Operations, Campbell Soup Company. with case studies from Citigroup and AbbVie.

Catherine J Moynihan, ACC Associate Vice President, Legal Management Services says: “I have been struck by the number of general counsel who are starting up legal departments and want to build it with an operational model in mind. They are thrilled with the ‘boot camp’ put on by an ensemble faculty of legal ops pros explaining how to put an operations road map in place and build the department with solid, scalable financial and vendor management practices underpinned by a technology strategy.”

3. AI has arrived In-House 

The number of in-house counsel with an eye on AI has risen (LawGeex had great face-to face meetups with many of our customers benefiting from AI during the conference). The automation of everyday legal tasks was center stage in Rise of the Machines: Can Compliance and Litigation Keep Up?, a panel moderated by Mark Huller, Senior Counsel from The Cincinnati Insurance Company, and featuring Khalid Al-Kofahi, R&D Vice President at Thomson Reuters; Cynthia Boeh, General Counsel at Other World Computing; and Martin Tully from Akerman LLP.

Kofahi used the mantra “what business are we in?” noting that if lawyers are in the advice business then they should embrace this. Boeh simply called AI “miraculous” for taking the menial tasks out of the law. Thomson Reuters also unveiled a new paper on AI for in-house counsel, finding that roughly two-thirds (67%) of all survey respondents stated they are confident and ready to try new technology. This included research showing 39% of in-house counsel predicted it will be commonplace within 10 years, and 37% believed it will take more than 10 years.

4. Networking good. But where’s the social media?

This gets meta. There was discussion on Twitter on the need for more social media interaction at conferences (this is now reflected in this round up of the best tweets, likely found on social media). Justin G. Castillo, Head of Legal at BT Americas, explains: “Obviously the point of social media is what Kevin O’Keefe says: Reputation and Relationships” (Kevin O’Keefe is founder of LexBlog seeking to share information, news, and commentary to help lawyers and other professionals looking to network online).

Castillo adds: “Sure, you can (and should) do retail networking and shake hands at receptions/conference, but you also can use social media to find those people you’d like to meet in person.  It also helps you tap into the wisdom and insights that smart colleagues put out every. single. Day.  To illustrate, I have a list of 219 people on my legal innovators list.  They provide me with invaluable insight into how technology and innovation are changing how attorneys work.  Attorneys who don’t tap into this are missing out big-time, and organizations such as ACC need to work harder to drive that point hoe and show lawyers the way. A few people “get it,” but we have a looooooong way to go.”

5. Healthfulness and Building Resilience

Nicolle Schippers, Associate General Counsel at Arag North America was among those tweeting about a fascinating session – which used techniques from the U.S military to create greater resilience among lawyers. This evaluated the challenges faced by lawyers who must practice skepticism and “pessimism”Tweets Michal Cardman, Employment law editor at XpertHR  (The) “pessimistic style useful for assessing legal risks. Attorneys should strive for *flexibility* and be optimistic where appropriate.”

6. #ProBono Proud 

Corporate Pro Bono, a partnership project of the Pro Bono Institute and the Association of Corporate Counsel (ACC), is designed to substantially increase the amount of pro bono work performed by in-house counsel. Here, President of the DC Bar, and Sr. V.P., General Counsel at ULLICO Inc, Patrick McGlone, tweets his support.

7. Swag!!!

Peter Halprin, attorney in Anderson Kill’s New York office, officially won the ACC Annual Conference (though let us know if your stash exceeds this).

8. Cultivating the Millennial in-house lawyer

Above The Law’s Joe Patrice provides one sensitive approach to cultivating in-house millennials. In a session on this topic, Ryan Evans, director, corporate counsel, Jack in the Box; Elizabeth Henries, attorney; Camille Olson, Seyfarth Shaw and Welly Tantono, country counsel, Hewlett-Packard Asia Pacific unpicked the legal generational gap issue. They talked about the differences between “Builders”, “Baby Boomers”, “Gen X” and “Millennials”.

9.  Champions of innovation at the ACC

Lucy Bassli, Assistant GC at Microsoft, shows the power of planning, processes and legaltech (although LawGeex unfortunately cannot take credit for this success, we are helping dozens of clients automate the approval of NDAs and other contracts in an hour or less).

Lucy was one of dozens of ACC “Value Champions” featured at the conference, transforming process and operations, including Urmila Paranjpe Baumann, assistant general Counsel at Express Scripts; Brad Lundeen, senior corporate attorney at Cabela’s Inc; Jami Segota, SVP GC at Ricoh USA; Michael Tucker, General Counsel at Avis Budget Group; and Mick Sheehy, General Counsel at Telstra.

10. Where is ACC Next Year?

Matt Nolan, VP & General Counsel, Ancra Group and Director of Heico Global Compliance (and friends) at the end of the conference. We also look forward to seeing you all in Austin next year.

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9 Top Trends making the ACC Annual Meeting the kickass event for in-house lawyers

On October 15-18 in Washington DC more than 4000 of the world’s top in-house counsels gather and debate on the future of law. It is a golden time for the in-house legal profession. Only last week the Financial Times branded in-house lawyers “the new pathfinders”, arguing that “the most innovative legal expertise is often close to home in organizations.”

These top 9 trends, show what lawyers at the world’s top companies are predicting as the major priorities for in-house lawyers at the conference.

1. Innovation through collaboration

Blake T Bilstad, SVP and General Counsel, of World Wrestling entertainment (WWE),  says the learning and networking opportunities at the ACC Annual meetup “are unparalleled for in-house lawyers.”

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Bilstad adds: “I find that our ACC Annual meetings provide a welcome ‘time out’ to the daily grind of an in-house practice — a chance to hit the reset button on learned behaviors over the years and to sit back and study with one’s peers as if we were back in law school, just on a more practical level.” It is a sentiment echoed by Jolene Marshall, Director of Legal at collaboration platform, Smartsheet. 

2. Swag 

Look we are all human, and getting the best free stuff is one of life’s true pleasures. For the uninitiated, MerriamWebster dictionary says: “The freebie swag, sometimes also spelled schwag, dates back to the 1960s and was used to describe promotional items. According to our files, early swag was everything from promotional records sent to radio stations to free slippers for airline passengers.”

Hundreds of these robots are available from LawGeex at the ACC Annual Meeting

Rob Falk, General Counsel, at the Human Rights Campaign Foundation says his French coffee maker picked up at an ACC Annual is now a regular part of his 5am wake up routine, calling it “the best swag from an ACC annual meeting”. There are lots of booths offering promotional items. Of note: the first 30 attendees to the ACC Law Department Management committee  lunch will get miniature bottles of Jack Daniels, to help get through the later conference sessions.

3. Washington Politics + Legal Coming together 

The conference will bring out legal lessons from the new-ish US administration. “Place is important” says Welly Tantono, Country Counsel, Hewlett-Packard in Asia Pacific.  “With the changes in the U.S political landscape, I think it’s a great chance for me to experience DC and gauge for myself the current feel of the U.S administration and the people who work in the Government.” Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta (who has served in three presidential-appointed, Senate-confirmed positions)  will provide an update on the state of the American workforce. The political theme continues with sessions including “Regulatory Turmoil During Trump’s First Year: Providing Advice When US Regulatory Change or Repeal Is Occurring, Imminent, or Uncertain”; Government Affairs and the General Counsel, and Planning for Brexit: What In-house Lawyers Should Do Now.

4. Legal technology adoption for in-house lawyers 

Don Tapscott opens the ACC Annual Meeting 2017

Don Tapscott, bestselling author of Blockchain Revolution: How the Technology Behind Bitcoin Is Changing Money, Business, and the World opens the conference, which then maintains a distinctive tech focus. Another session is entitled: What to Deploy Now: A Candid Discussion about the What, Where, When and How of Deploying Existing Technologies in your Legal Department.  This features tales of legal technology adoption from Stephanie Lambert, VP, Associate General Counsel, Staples; Ravi Kiran Mamidanna, Senior Counsel at Abbott Laboratories and Ann Marie McLaughlin, Director of Legal Knowledge and Vendor Management at Liberty Mutual Group. (For more on this theme check out The In-House Counsel’s LegalTech Buyers Guide – a free, downloadable guide that showcases technology solutions lawyers need to know).

5.  Legal Rockstars leaving legal shook up

There are several chances to hear from winners of the ACC Value Champion series, sharing scars and victories in creating landmark processes including client firm partnerships and driving legal savings.

Speakers who are winner of the top innovation accolade include Urmila Paranjpe Baumann, assistant general Counsel at Express Scripts; Brad Lundeen, senior corporate attorney at Cabela’s Inc; Jami Segota, SVP GC at Ricoh USA; Michael Tucker, General Counsel at Avis Budget Group, and Mick Sheehy, General Counsel at Telstra. Then there is chance to meet Elvis himself (below).

6. Legal management from Elvis 

In the rapidly changing profession, the ACC Law Department Management Committee (LDMC) committee is focused on management of people, workflow, information, knowledge, legal service providers.

Stephen Roth, Vice President of the committee and General Counsel at JTV, has the task of bringing Elvis. He says: “The LDMC’s slogan for this year is “Best Content. Most Fun. Elvis is there to inject extra energy into our committee meeting and lunch.  It’s also meant to give people a reason to come check us out and learn more about what the committee does.” (Please book ahead if you are attending the LDMC lunch via the registration form online); and to learn entrepreneurship from Elvis see here.

7. The rise and rise of AI

The boom in legal AI has changed the landscape of the in-house profession forever. The ACC asks a number of interesting questions in sessions: Rise of the Machines, Can Compliance and Litigation Keep Up? In another session, presenters debate: AI for Corporate Departments: What is Real Now? The questions raised include: will it eventually be considered negligent not to use AI to identify and monitor compliance risks? What are the possibilities of AI in core legal work from contract review, to litigation, prediction of jury verdicts and Ediscovery?

8.  Legal Operations and the new norm 

There is a movement towards a (more commercially-minded) Legal Operations role in businesses (26% of general counsel have legal operations functions, up from 16% in 2016). The ACC has helped lead the revolution, and the annual meeting highlights legal operations for the first time in its history. Catherine J Moynihan, ACC Associate Vice President, Legal Management Services says: “Well over 300 have signed up to come to the session for General Counsel who are considering adding a legal operations function (session titlled “How to Set Up a Best in Class Legal Ops Function”). Moynihan adds: “There is lots more to come to meet demand for training, including monthly webcasts and a toolkit on the 14 topics featured in the ACC Maturity Model for the Operations of a Legal Department.”

9. The future of the Contract 

The changing nature of contracts and technologies role in a digitized, global, and software-driven world is a major subplot. In Key Issues in Negotiating and Drafting Subscription Services Agreements, panelists will discuss best practices and recent trends in Software as a Service (SaaS) contracts, including practical advice on key clauses and terms found in these perennial software contracts.  Then, the wry master contract drafter Ken Adams, author of a deceptively brilliant blog about modern contracting, provides a masterclass on clear and efficient drafting.

In an interactive game-show format, the ACC International Legal Affairs Committee, will talk contracts in Deal or No Deal: Negotiating and Drafting International Contracts.

To check out AI contract review platform LawGeex and find out how businesses can quickly answer the question “Can I sign this?” come visit the booth near the entrance (you may also get a free robot).

Jonathan Marciano, Communications Director at LawGeex, is  originally from London. He is  currently in Tel Aviv, helping to bring about the legal revolution. Follow him on Twitter. @J_Marciano

Tales of LegalTech Adoption: Vicky Lockie, formerly Associate GC at Pearson

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In a series of monthly interviews, LawGeex speaks to top In-House Counsel adopting legal technology to enhance productivity. Here, we speak to Vicky Lockie, Senior Consultant VBL Consulting, and formerly Associate GC at Pearson. 

Vicky Lockie is formerly associate General Counsel at Pearson where she oversaw major change in the legal department. She now uses her expertise to give legal teams advice and provide services effectively.

What is Pearson and how is its in-house legal team organized? 

Pearson is the world’s leading learning company, employing more than 35,000 people in 70 countries. Pearson is undergoing significant change as its business transforms moving from print to digital, from products to services, selling more directly to consumer and into the world’s growth economies.  This is all underpinned by a major restructuring of back office systems designed to simplify business processes.

As part of this strategic shift Pearson has created a global legal team of approx. 170 staff with the bulk of its legal team based in the US and UK.

What problem were you trying to solve?  

Like most in-house legal departments, we were under pressure to ‘do more with less’.

We decided to use the corporate drive to simplify business processes as an opportunity to do things differently and to redesign some of the legal departments processes.

Education company Pearson was forced to change its legal strategies as it began selling more directly to consumer and into the world’s growth economies.

How did you decide what to do? 

Against the backdrop of wider business transformation, we identified a business team which was using a disproportionate amount of legal resource. That team we generating many low value, low risk contracts needing lots of legal support. The work of that team had been done the same way for a long time and provided an opportunity for process improvement.

What was your objective? 

We had several objectives; for the legal team, we wanted to free-up lawyers to deal with more strategic and intellectually challenging work; for the business team we wanted to give them more control over this area of work as it was closely tied to product creation.

we wanted to free-up lawyers to deal with more strategic and intellectually challenging work; for the business team we wanted to give them more control

 

To achieve these objectives, we decided the business should be enabled to create their own contracts and move away from a set of manual, time consuming and resource heavy processes.

As we only had a very modest budget we decided that these objectives would be delivered using our e-signature tool. Most e-signature tools allow for creation of basic automated workflows and embedded forms, in this case a set of simple standard contract templates. This would provide a simple solution which could automate the process and provide valuable data.

Practically what did you do?

As a first step, we worked out the current ‘as is’ process. This required discussion with all stakeholders both within the legal function and the business teams.

The existing process was examined to identify areas of simplification. After elimination of any unnecessary, out of date, duplicate steps a new process was created embedding the use of the e-signature tool.

Collaboration over this process is essential to ensure success of any such project.

With the new process established templates for the contracts were created. Standardization simplification and rationalization of existing contract templates was essential to reduce legal risk and to ensure the business teams could choose the correct contract template to use.

Finally, with everything in place we trained the legal and business teams who would be following the new processes. We also created a set of support information containing the training materials, ‘how to’ video clips, and FAQ’s which were placed on the intranet site.

How did you communicate change to the business?

It was essential to ensure that the business stakeholders were fully engaged with the project. As part of the initial planning process all stakeholders were identified and communicated with. We spent considerable time on preparation, particularly with the legal stakeholders – most importantly understanding anxieties and letting people vent. Getting it all out upfront helps not to derail the project further down the line.

The business and legal stakeholders were fully engaged with process mapping and the training. This collaboration brought benefits far beyond the scope of the project.

Pearson’s transformation saw a reduction in average contract turnaround times from several weeks to less than 24 hours, and cost to legal per contract reduced by over 80%

After implementation, all users were asked to participate in a feedback process. It was important that the feedback was seen to be taken seriously and improvements were actioned quickly.

What have the results been? 

For this team the move away from bespoke contracts has resulted in many benefits including;

  • Reduction in average contract turnaround times from several weeks to less than 24 hours
  • Cost to legal per contract reduced by over 80%
  • Adoption of standardised and consistent contracts has reduced legal risk
  • Move to paperless contracting has reduced postage, filing & storage costs as well as being more environmentally friendly
  • Increased levels of user satisfaction

What advice would you give to other In-House Counsel facing change?

  • Pick something relatively quick and simple as your first project. By being able to execute a project successfully you will gain trust and credibility not only with the teams who are affected by the change but also more widely in the business.
  • Be clear (with yourself and others) about what you are trying to achieve and why.
  • Understand the change process – the change curve is real.
  • Remember that you are dealing with individuals, people all react to change differently and go through the change process at different speeds.  Allow more time than you think  and you will need and be mindful of the tone of your communications.
  • Think about how you use technology – there are lots of tools on the market but the real key to success is the process, technology is just a tool to enable a better process.

Do you think it is harder to encourage change among lawyers than other professions? 

I do. With any change, it very important to understand the psychology of people you are dealing with. Inherently the legal profession is conservative, lawyers have been trained to focus on detail, analyse all potential issues, they tend to seek perfection and can be risk adverse.

Should lawyers be worried about automation or rise of technology?

It depends on their perspective. I see the increase in automation as a real opportunity for the profession to move away from the routine to focus on intellectually challenging and strategically important work. However as this will involve a major shift in the way in which our work is rewarded – shifting from output based (the billable hour) to outcome based reward I can see how many will see this as a threat they don’t want to embrace.

I would advocate a ‘wake up and smell the coffee’ approach rather than adopting the ostrich position.

What tech would you most like to see invented for in-house lawyers?

A real virtual ‘Alexa like’ assistant where you can speak a request and your assistant can find what you are looking for or execute your request.

e.g. “could you find the email I send to someone at x company a couple of weeks ago, where I mentioned project y”

Is today’s tech age, a better or worse time to be an in-house counsel?

Again, it depends on your perspective. For those who relish change I think in house counsel have an unparalleled opportunity to learn new skills and embrace new ways of working but it’s not for the faint hearted.

Vicky is among the top in-house counsel featured in The In-House Counsel’s LegalTech Buyers Guide.

Download the full guide now to see the best LegalTech for in-house lawyers today including more tools for contract drafting; contract review; digital signature; contract and matter management; contract due diligence; legal research; eDiscovery; Prediction technology; Intellectual Property; Expertise automation; eBilling; Legal analytics; simple task management; and Communications.

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Get the FREE Legal Technology Buyer’s Guide for In-House Counsel and discover:

  • 60+ page practical and jargon-free reference guide
  • 100+ top technology solutions for legal departments
  • Personal recommendations and stories from dozens of in-house lawyers and legal experts
  • Explanations of an in-house legaltech buying journey, including barriers to adoption, establishing and monitoring KPIs, and more

Top task management tools for Lawyers: Trello; Evernote and Asana

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Brian Schmidt is Chief of Staff, and former General Counsel at Trello, a visual collaboration tool that creates a shared perspective on projects. Schmidt says Trello “occupies the organizational space between blank canvas-type tools (e.g. a word doc) and a niche-specific, structure-enforcing project management tool (e.g. Salesforce)“. In his role, Shmidt uses the collaboration tool to make his contract review process less opaque in the 100-employee business (Trello has since been acquired by Atlassian but still is very much a standalone product).  Schmidt advises in-house counsel to create a Trello board showing clearly  at what stage contracts are at for approval, and create collaboration between lawyers and those who rely on the legal department.

Kristen Habacht, VP of Sales at Trello says there was a time when it was just her and Schmidt, going back and forth via email on contracts “I originally made the board so I could understand whether [Counsel] had a chance to review a contract I had sent over. And then as the team came in, we made a process where they could funnel through this board instead of always going through me,” Kristen explains.

Schmidt says: “If you were trying to get this all done by email, you would never have the whole picture because communications would be siloed between individuals, not shared across teams.Nobody would be able to get visibility into what the teams were working on.”

Trello is one example of a workflow, or task, management tool. These tools, along with names such as Evernote or Asana, give lawyers the ability to capture important information on-the-go and basic oversight into matters. The company has also just announced a mjaor desktop app upgrade gaining further adoration among its 17 million users, with TechCrunch noting that “Now, Trello users will get all of the usual features they know from the browser, with the added ability to get native desktop notifications and add cards from anywhere thanks to support for plenty of keyboard shortcuts.”

In the same category, Asana users can sign up to the workflow tool through their Google account. It allows teams to create tasks and subtasks and organize them into shared projects, lists, meeting agendas, and other initiatives, with views customizable by project or due date.

Catherine Reach, Director, Law Practice Management & Technology for the Chicago Bar Association, discussing the merits of Trello against Asana, comments: “The feature sets are roughly the same. However, the terminology and interface of Asana will be more comfortable for word-driven lawyers. Those who have worked in project-driven organizations or like a more-graphical interface will feel more comfortable in Trello.”

Meanwhile, Evernote is already used by nearly 25% of lawyers. It provides the ability to capture notes and recordings in a multitude of formats.  Evernote might contain your legal research files, management data, e-mail archive collection, case and matter information, documents, and tasks. Heidi Alexander,  Director of the Massachusetts Law Office Management Assistance Program, author of “Evernote as a Law Practice Tool says“If you are a lawyer you understand being constantly bombarded with competing demands from colleagues and staff, and parties. If you do not have a way to manage those demands and information, you will be in chaos.

” Every attorney uses (Evernote)for slightly different purposes – the most common uses are legal research, case management, productivity and time management.

“Legal research is the most common use by attorneys. You can use the web clipper to save case law from the internet  and then tag it with a case proposition, a fact pattern, jurisdiction and then when you later need that case all you need to do is search by tag. In contrast, when I was in practice we would print all of our cases annotate them at the top throw them in a folder and look through all these files.”

“The terminology and interface of Asana will be more comfortable for word-driven lawyers. Those who have worked in project-driven organizations or like a more-graphical interface will feel more comfortable in Trello”

– Catherine Reach,

In a (second) book about how lawyers use Evernote (Evernote for Lawyers) David Ward sums up the benefits of this technology for simple tasks: “You’ll finally be able to gain control of all of the information and paperwork in your life and organize and prioritize everything so you get the most important things done.”

This is an extract from The In-House Counsel’s LegalTech Buyers Guide (a free publication). 

Download the full guide now to see the best LegalTech for in-house lawyers today including more tools for contract drafting; contract review; digital signature; contract and matter management; contract due diligence; legal research; eDiscovery; Prediction technology; Intellectual Property; Expertise automation; eBilling; Legal analytics; simple task management; and Communications.

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Get the FREE Legal Technology Buyer’s Guide for In-House Counsel and discover:

  • 60+ page practical and jargon-free reference guide
  • 100+ top technology solutions for legal departments
  • Personal recommendations and stories from dozens of in-house lawyers and legal experts
  • Explanations of an in-house LegalTech buying journey, including barriers to adoption, establishing and monitoring KPIs, and more

 

The joy (and challenges) of selling to Legal

Legal buying and selling at the ACC Mid Year Meeting

Legal buying and selling at the ACC Mid Year Meeting. Bottom Right: LawGeex’s message to Lawyers: Hire A Robot. Get Sh*t Done.

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Etai Rosen, VP of Sales at LawGeex

Having spent the past 12 years selling software solutions and building sales teams for successful tech companies, I’ve sold to some tough customers, and for the first time, I’ve started to sell to lawyers.

The legal profession has many leading innovators, pioneers even, and with any industry there are going to be those ahead of the pack. After only on my first six months here, I want to share my thoughts on the joys and challenges of selling to the profession, based on hundreds of conversations with lawyer-buyers. Maybe something I’ve learnt will help to spur this emerging and exciting market forward.

The Good 

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First the good news.

I passionately believe in technology that improves processes and brings organizational growth. Secondly, I think this entire space is fascinating because the in-house legal team is often the last department in the organization to adopt technology solutions.

I am convinced that’s going to change in the next few years. Lawyers are becoming more tech-driven. Partly this is because of the amount of work on lawyer’s plates and the ability of tech to automate some of the drudge work. One of the things I’ve heard a lot from lawyers is: “I didn’t go to law school to review standard agreements”. Because of the pain points being faced by lawyers, legal teams are very keen to speak to companies that can help them out.

Another great opportunity from a sales point of view is that lawyers also tend to be both intelligent and skeptical. This actually enables them to quickly understand the value of a product. They also ask some really tough questions. If you’re able to build a good case for your product they very soon become strong advocates (pun intended) compared to other industries I have encountered.

Now onto the challenges…

Challenge One: Legal is new to buying 

buying in market

Other departments have learned how to justify technology purchasing to the C-level over the past 20 years. These other departments are also skilled at building a business case and presenting how it will help them achieve their Key Performance Indicators (KPIs).

This is often a new reality for law departments.

Legal does not have the same legacy of efficient buying—and consequently does not enjoy the same technology budget as other departments. In my conversations, more than 80% of the Legal budget goes toward salaries and outside counsel. Sometimes there is no budget or process for buying technology at all.

Challenge 2: Is Legal from Mars and Business from Venus?

Despite the obvious benefits of reducing time and saving money, many lawyers do not ask questions that other buyers have asked me throughout my career. “What’s the Return on Investment? How will this streamline our operations? How much time will this save me? How much additional revenue would this generate for the company?”

Legal is often the only department in the organization that doesn’t have KPIs (Key Performance Indicators). I have yet to come across a single in-house counsel able to accurately tell me how many contracts they review per month or what their contract review turnaround time is. It is almost impossible for a business unit to improve their contract processes when they don’t measure their KPIs.

Challenge 3: Contract policies create legal risks 

Legal policies are not always defined or codified. I have no doubt that legal teams that spend a lot of time reviewing and red-lining agreements are very good at what they do. However, this can create a contract bottleneck and the business slows down because of it. Legal quite rightly can justify this process, as they are often the final line of defense for the company.

What ultimately happens though, is that after much frustration, commercial teams start signing agreements themselves. Alternatively, they might just stop sending contracts to legal entirely, leading to an even greater legal exposure. What ends up happening is the legal team’s focus on risk mitigation can actually lead to increased legal risk.

Challenge 4: Less fear of AI, than fear about accuracy

Despite over-hyped talk about lawyers losing their jobs to robots, the majority of lawyers I speak to are very interested in learning about exciting advances that will help them do their job more efficiently. They agree they shouldn’t spend as much time as they are reviewing the mundane contracts. However, their main fear isn’t robot lawyers; It is that AI isn’t as accurate as a human lawyer.

However, we believe that AI is not meant to be used as a standalone tool. The goal is to use AI plus humans (like an autopilot) with AI responding to the needs of the legal department in question. Together, they can ensure that contracts are reviewed much more accurately, and more consistently, than a human lawyer alone.

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We see this in the automotive industry. There is still a debate whether autonomous cars are better than human drivers. Mobileye, a company recently acquired by Intel for $15.3 billion, has developed an aid to driver alerting them to risk. Studies conducted by Mobileye and others, have proven that machine + humans reduce accidents significantly. Some countries are now requiring all cars manufactured to be equipped with accident reducing technology.

I believe the same change should, and will, occur in the legal field. As the market becomes more educated, regulators will understand that technology will improve how we audit legal agreements, and may eventually require all businesses to use some form of contract review automation.

The future of selling to legal

THE ONLY THING

We have had a significant number of clients who signed up soon after the first demo — one other good point of working with lawyers is once they agree to buy, they get their contracts back pretty quickly. But the challenges for buyers, and sellers, of legal services remain.

The vast majority of lawyers have yet to implement any legal technology. The majority (60%) of lawyers not using any automation tools at all.

At the same time, we are in the midst of a technology-fueled legal revolution and most lawyers are excited about the enormous opportunities available to them. Sales people are becoming better as we do more demos, and our product and engineering teams constantly improve our offering based on feedback from our clients (we just released a new version based entirely on the feedback of clients).

Lawyers are becoming better buyers, enjoying the experience of sales calls, where they can be open and honest about the challenges they face. We all benefit as the quality of the available technology improves, while automated solutions are slowly becoming more affordable than their alternatives.

Today’s leaders of legal technology adoption are those that recognize that business and legal aren’t unconnected entities with different goals – they’re the Earth and the Moon, and their gravitational pull affects the tides of change.

For a demo from Etai or one of our other (very nice) salespeople about LawGeex book a demo now.

If you are considering legal technology also check out The In-House Counsel’s LegalTech Buyers Guide – a free, downloadable guide that showcases more than 100 must-know technology solutions which solve the daily challenges faced by in-house lawyer.

LawGeex 4.0 release sees next generation of AI contract review for businesses

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TEL AVIV, Israel, September 6 2017: LawGeex, the leading AI contract review platform for businesses, has today launched product enhancements that provide more control, speed and consistency than ever before.

LawGeex combines machine learning algorithms and text analytics to quickly review and approve everyday contracts, helping businesses answer the question “Can I sign this?”

The new features and significant design upgrade empower customers to have deeper and wider control of their AI-powered reviews, contract editing and approval process.

Main features of the latest release include:

More granular control when creating legal policies in the LawGeex Policy CenterThe introduction of specific variations of legal concepts allows businesses more granular control in clause concepts they want to see — and do not want to see — in contracts before signing them. Based on these pre-set policies, the LawGeex’s AI can automatically accept, red flag or reject clauses in incoming contracts. 

Policy Center Main new blog

Revamp of LawGeex’s Action Center — where the contract can be edited after the AI’s first line of defense. When reviewing a contract within LawGeex, customers can now clearly see which of their policies were applied to each clause and can red-line the contract within the platform, instantly inserting their company’s standard clause language with one click (LawGeex also provides default language). Users also have full visibility on their company’s clause definitions, fallback positions, tips, and more, during the editing process, bringing an unparalleled transparency and cohesiveness between a company’s policies and the actual contract review. The enhancements also include improved layout for LawGeex AI-reviewed contracts. Clauses are grouped simply by their status as “Missing” or “Present”, and reviewers are simply able to manually override the acceptance or rejection of clauses.

Lawgeex Action Center new blog

LawGeex’s SaaS platform and servers are now fully ISO/IEC-27001 certified, ensuring the highest enterprise levels of privacy and security.

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Michal Bell, Head of Product at LawGeex said: “This new generation of LawGeex is based on detailed feedback from our clients. LawGeex now offers the most simple and transparent contract approval ever. Businesses at a stroke, can enjoy fast, accurate and consistent contract review, putting an end to legal bottlenecks.

About LawGeex

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LawGeex (http://www.lawgeex.com ) is transforming legal operations using artificial intelligence, and helping businesses save hundreds of hours and thousands of dollars reviewing and approving everyday contracts.

Founded in 2014 by international lawyer Noory Bechor and leading AI expert Ilan Admon, LawGeex enables businesses to automate their contract approval process, improving consistency, operational efficiency and getting business moving faster.

LawGeex combines machine learning algorithms, text analytics and the knowledge of expert lawyers to deliver in-depth contract reviews using the customer’s pre-defined legal policies. LawGeex removes the contract bottleneck, helping customers’ legal, procurement and operations teams focus on the big picture without getting lost in the paperwork.

For further details and to try out LawGeex 4.0 get in touch today.

Read more: Bringing Control, Accuracy and Simplicity to Legal automation

Bringing Control, Accuracy and Simplicity to Legal automation

Bringing Control, Accuracy and Simplicity to Legal automation

Michal Bell, LawGeex Head of Product, on the next generation of AI contract review helping reduce legal risk through consistency

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Legal knowledge tends to reside in lawyers’ heads, creating a dependency on lawyers sharing their know-how. AI is helping to distribute this knowledge simply, across an organization.

Ensuring legal consistency across an organization is one of the principles of LawGeex. Which is why today we are proud to announce the Launch of LawGeex 4.0. To see what’s in the release and get a demo for yourselves see here.

For the first time, a veteran GC who has been at a company for 30 years, a paralegal who has just joined, or a non-legal member, will have at their fingertips the same institutional knowledge needed to effectively review and approve everyday contracts before signing them. Anyone in an organization can now review contracts quickly and accurately, every time.

Our new LawGeex release provides granular variations on legal concepts. This allows businesses more control when pinpointing the legal concepts they want to approve—and do not want to approve—when LawGeex AI reviews their incoming contracts.

Take the example of a Limitation of liability clause (this limits the amount of exposure a company faces in the event a lawsuit is filed or another claim).

In-house lawyers can now go beyond merely saying whether they want contracts they sign to include a limitation of liability clause. They can outline for instance, what carve out from the cap on liability is permissible according to their company’s policy.  For example, acceptable carve-outs from the cap could be a breach of confidentiality or damages arising from gross negligence or willful misconduct.  A Customer can even specify the exact amount at which the damages should be capped—all simply and clearly.

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The upshot is that the AI review can now follow customers’ granular legal guidelines. This results in more tailored and accurate contract review.

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In a second important strike for consistency, in-house lawyers can now plug in their company’s sample clause language and fallback positions to each legal concept reviewed by LawGeex. These business standards are then clearly visible next to each clause when editing the contract within the platform. This increases the speed and consistency of processes and language across everyday contract review, whether your teams are based in London, New York or Tokyo.

Freeing up time 

It is important to note that these enhancements follow significant feedback from our customers. They are excited about a future in which they spend less time reviewing everyday contracts.  Lawyers are smart people and do not enjoy doing robotic legal work. Reviewing NDAs is not what anyone went to law school for. Most of our in-house counsel and procurement customers are quite direct when speaking to us that they just want burdensome processes and simple contracts off their plates completely.

Preventing contract time bomb risks 

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More than this, many contract managers and in-house lawyers told us during consultation, that they have been burnt by ineffective contract review. They simply no longer see manual routines, and reinventing of wheels, as fit for purpose. In one case, a client came to us after a (fairly obvious) contract risk was not spotted ahead of signing, leading to a costly lawsuit.

Even those who have not suffered direct cost damages, all face pressure from sales and procurement teams to turnaround contracts faster. In some cases, there has been additional frustration from both legal teams and those reliant on legal, that the same contracts seem to be reviewed and interpreted any number of ways. It is often impossible to explain why this should be the case.

The new LawGeex 4.0 and its extreme level of granularity and added control is going to help any contract manager or lawyer who has faced these situations — and help prevent such future risks arising.

Simple, clean design 

In the redesign, we also wanted lawyers and contract reviewers to have a clean, professional interface that follows closely the software and workflows they are used to. Lawyers have a lot of work and volumes are only growing, so making technology understandable and super simple is at the core of our product.

Security is the priority 

Finally, there is nothing more important than security when it comes to sensitive contract information. We are pleased to announce that LawGeex’s SaaS platform and servers are now fully ISO/IEC-27001 certified, ensuring the highest levels of privacy and security.

I look forward to sharing many more updates as we continue to bring technology that helps businesses reduce mundane paperwork and focus on more strategic tasks.

We value every piece of feedback and would love you to get in touch with us to suggest further improvements and enhancements. Please get in touch at hello@lawgeex.com

Michal Bell, is Head of Products at LawGeex, responsible for the company’s product strategy and roadmap. 

Michal has extensive experience in managing market-leading products from initial inception to maturity. She is passionate about delivering productive and innovative solutions that provide long-lasting value.

 

For further details and a demo of the new-look LawGeex get in touch today

6 communications tools Lawyers need to know

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In this brave new world, lawyers should not forget about one of the more basic and cheap, but extremely effective, ways to instantly save time and money, work smarter and faster.

Better communication and collaboration could be as simple as investing in quality Video Conferencing software to better communicate with clients and out-of-office colleagues, or allowing remote access to email inboxes and computer desktops. Thanks to cheap bandwidth and a wide selection of video conferencing services, trying to coordinate meetings in various geographic locations and interacting with remote workers is no longer the logistical and technical challenge it used to be. IT departments often have preferred solutions and this may be the first place to ask about available options. Here are six major communications tools that are transforming the daily working of lawyers.

1. Citrix GoToMeeting

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Citrix GoToMeeting (which begins at $19 per month) is one of the best-known video conferencing services. Citrix offers three versions: Starter, Pro, and Plus. Starter (which begins at $19 per month) supports up to 10 participants.

2. Cisco WebEx

www.webex.com cost: Free

Cisco WebEx allows users to record the meetings video, audio, and on-screen displays, mute and unmute participants, switch hosts with ease, share files, share screens, share applications. The free service allows meetings with up to two other people, while plans begin at $19 a month.

3. UberConference

www.uberconference.com cost: Free

UberConference gives you an easy, powerful, and pain-free way to schedule and run audio conferences, all without requiring annoying PINs. UberConference is free for unlimited calls. It also offers a Business version for $10 a month giving you your own local number for outbound calling to participants, recurring conferences, international dial-ins and more. CEO Craig Walker sets out some of the main selling points for lawyers. “These are private, important issues you’re dealing with. You need to know who is on the call, and whether they belong there.” Once you have the right people on the call, just hit the lock icon and nobody else can join your conversation. Features include record keeping of how long the call lasted to track legal costs.

“These are private, important issues you’re dealing with. You need to know who is on the call, and whether they belong there.” – Craig Walker, UberConference 

 

4. Slack

www.slack.com cost: Free

Slack allows you to build a team site and put all of your team communications in one place (called “channels”). You can utilize real time messaging and file sharing, one-to-one messaging for private conversations, and you can search all of the information in your Slack project channel, including documents and conversation threads. You can download the mobile app or a desktop version (or both). You can create channels for teams or for specific projects. Slack allows you to drag and drop all of your files, images, PDFs, documents, and spreadsheets and share them. You can even invite people from outside the company to join a project—be sure to label privileged communications and documents.

5. Skype

www.skype.com cost: Free

Skype needs no introduction, having become an indispensable technology for modern lawyers. There are two versions for online videoconferencing: the free, consumer version most of us know, and Skype for Business. This latter version is ideal if you want to have very large meetings (the standard Skype client is limited to 25, while Skype for Business raises this to 250); it also allows a sophisticated conference room setup. The paid-for version costs $5.50/month for the service. It adds high-definition video to group conferences, the ability to join meetings from a web browser (including anonymous connections), desktop sharing and remote control, Outlook schedule integration, and the ability to record meetings.

6. Legaler

www. home.legaler.com cost: Free

Sydney-based Legaler described as “Skype and Slack for Lawyers” is specifically designed for the legal profession, making online meetings simple and secure with end-to-end encryption for video calls, messaging, file sharing (allowing online sharing of documents and edits), and screen sharing, giving you the freedom to work from anywhere, on any device. Legaler helps you keep all your important meeting details in one place by automatically archiving your meeting notes, duration, recordings, agendas, messages, and files by matter.

This is an extract from The In-House Counsel’s LegalTech Buyers Guide (a free publication). 

Download the full guide now to see the best LegalTech for in-house lawyers today including more tools for contract drafting; contract review; digital signature; contract and matter management; contract due diligence; legal research; eDiscovery; Prediction technology; Intellectual Property; Expertise automation; eBilling; Legal analytics; simple task management; and Communications.

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Get the FREE Legal Technology Buyer’s Guide for In-House Counsel and discover:

  • 60+ page practical and jargon-free reference guide
  • 100+ top technology solutions for legal departments
  • Personal recommendations and stories from dozens of in-house lawyers and legal experts
  • Explanations of an in-house legaltech buying journey, including barriers to adoption, establishing and monitoring KPIs, and more

Tales of LegalTech Adoption: Roberto Facundus at Tongal

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In a new series of monthly interviews, LawGeex speaks to top In-House Counsel adopting legal technology to enhance productivity. Here, we speak to Roberto Facundus, General Counsel and Chief Operating Officer at Tongal.

Roberto Facundus

Roberto Facundus, is the General Counsel and Chief Operating Officer at Tongal, Inc. headquartered in Santa Monica, CA and is an adjunct professor of law at Tulane University.

How is Tongal’s in-house team organized? Size and reporting function?

On the legal side, just me and one super lawyer.  I report to the CEO and serve the Board of Directors as Corporate Secretary.

What are the biggest challenges you face as an in-house team? 

The biggest challenge is keeping up with where we are headed from a product innovation and customer demand perspective.  Anticipating the challenges that may arise from innovation requires a constant effort from many stakeholders and plenty of communication. Challenges exist in coordinating with teams that are not yet aware of the new changes or the impact of those changes will have on their role. We also have a somewhat unique situation in that we have to consider the impact of all decisions from the perspective our clients, the Company, AND our creative community. Our creative community is the lifeblood of our organization so we always have to keep their interests in mind.

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Founded in 2009, Tongal connects businesses in need of creative work with an online community of writers, directors, and production companies. The biggest legal challenge is keeping up with where the fast-paced business is heading.

Which LegalTech do you use?

We use DocuSign, AdobeSign, and Hello Sign for signatures and are generally open to any other types of electronic signature technologies. We also encourage our clients, partners, and community to use these tools. We use Salesforce for contract workflows, internal collaboration, tracking of contract terms, renewals management, and sharing. Having previously worked at Salesforce, as the Global Compliance Attorney, I became fairly familiar the functionality of the platform that goes beyond merely tracking and reporting sales.

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Salesforce enables tracking contract renewals, to ensure swift renewal or notification of pending contract expiration.

The business was already using Salesforce on the sales side so we only had to implement a few additional features through the Salesforce API and educate our employees on usage to capture additional data that is helpful in running the legal and operations side of the business.  Overall, we’re probably not at the upper end of LegalTech users though we are certainly open to learning about and utilizing more technologies.

What problems and pain points were you trying to solve with tech adoption?

Getting work done more effectively, saving time, and reducing costs.

How did you begin the process of thinking about efficiency/ your buying journey?

I think there are a few questions to consider. Will this technology make me better at my job?  Does this technology integrate into my existing working process?  Will it be easy to use?  Will it be easily adopted?

I don’t want another login so single sign-on or no sign-on features are a plus. I don’t want to sit through another long training session or ask someone else to sit through a long training session, so an intuitive UI is important.

What results have you seen through the adoption of LegalTech?

Increased information flow, increased efficiency, and increased visibility.  LegalTech is another tool to help anticipate problems and limit the potential negative impact on the business.  Tech has helped reduce the need for extra hires and to keep outside counsel fees to a minimum.

What processes or improvements are you looking to enhance using tech in the future?

Automating review of certain documents. In particular for Tongal, reviewing release, publicity rights, and licensing forms. In the future, I think technology can be used to negotiate contracts with simple terms. I definitely see a day when there is a negotiation using AI alone. I speak to the other side probably 50% of the time as we often just exchange a few rounds of red lines via email before reaching an agreement.  Looking at the other uses of AI, I don’t think we’re far away from this type of application. And let’s face it, lawyers are a pain in the ass, so any technology that reduces time having to interact with another lawyer is probably worth consideration.

And let’s face it, lawyers are a pain in the ass, so any technology that reduces time having to interact with another lawyer is probably worth consideration. 

What is the main advice you would give any in-house counsel about the challenges/ opportunities or obstacles in a legal tech buying journey?

Firstly, you have to follow trends at the risk of being left behind. I recognize that there will be many things created that are not relevant or helpful, but one out of 100 might be worth knowing about.  This doesn’t mean you have to be an early adopter, but you should at least be an early observer.  I think you’re doing a disservice to you and your company if you are not paying attention. Secondly, will you actually use the technology or is the setup and integration too complicated?  Just because something may initially seem cool, you should think about how you will be able to integrate it into your work process and whether it will really make you better at your job.  And I don’t mean can you delegate integration of the technology to someone on your team or the IT department. I mean can you, yourself, integrate and work with the technology. If you can’t get your hands digitally dirty and do it yourself, then it’s not a technology worth pursuing.

Did the adoption of tech in your case mean a reduction in staff?

No. We’ve managed to keep the same levels, though I anticipate increasing both staff and tech adoption as the company grows.

Should lawyers be worried about automation or rise of technology?

Yes and no.  Yes, because cybersecurity is such a hot topic from so many perspectives – regulatory, information security, privacy, etc.  All of these have a commercial impact.  Lawyers should be worried about the impact of technology, but as with any risk, it must be measured.  Each business is different.  Just because you see a large company get hacked resulting in the disclosure of millions of pieces of customer data, it doesn’t mean you have to suddenly allocate 75% of your budget towards protecting against cyber security breaches if your company doesn’t store any customer data.  Like any legal analysis, you have to assess your risk.

No, lawyers shouldn’t be worried because ultimately, technology is there to help you and make you more efficient and give you access to more information. While technology shouldn’t be followed blindly, it’s not going anywhere so you might as well embrace it at the risk of becoming obsolete yourself.

Is today’s tech age, a better or worse time to be an in-house counsel?

Of course I think it’s better.  It is certainly a benefit that we have more tools at our disposal than ever before.  That said, LegalTech is still relatively nascent so we need people to innovate, experiment, and try new technologies that will make us better as a profession.

Roberto is among the top in-house counsel featured in The In-House Counsel’s LegalTech Buyers Guide.

Download the full guide now to see the best LegalTech for in-house lawyers today including more tools for contract drafting; contract review; digital signature; contract and matter management; contract due diligence; legal research; eDiscovery; Prediction technology; Intellectual Property; Expertise automation; eBilling; Legal analytics; simple task management; and Communications.

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Get the FREE Legal Technology Buyer’s Guide for In-House Counsel and discover:

  • 60+ page practical and jargon-free reference guide
  • 100+ top technology solutions for legal departments
  • Personal recommendations and stories from dozens of in-house lawyers and legal experts
  • Explanations of an in-house legaltech buying journey, including barriers to adoption, establishing and monitoring KPIs, and more

Legal winter is coming. Will you leave the wall?

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There is a wall that lawyers have hidden behind for decades, in the face of radical change to other industries. We have seen these walls crumbling in neighboring ancient kingdoms, such as finance or insurance . But in the legal profession, the wall, representing doing what has always been done, remains solid.

The Watchers On The Legal Wall

The reason for lawyers’ resistance comes from the watchers on the legal wall. This guard has relied  on things staying the way they are now (as they have for centuries). Behind the wall, their technological lives have not changed: lawyers are still using pens, paper, printers and faxes to do their legal work. Microsoft has even claimed that lawyers spend 90% of their day in Outlook and Word.

Microsoft research

Legal innovators are speaking up against the wall-watchers.  In the words of Netapp General Counsel Matt Fawcett: “We were the last industry to provide employees with cell phones. In 1999, I remember getting frustrated with a firm and saying, ‘Our copier repair man carries a cell phone – why not my high- priced lawyers?’ Even today, many “old school” partners still take pride in not being reachable and having their secretaries (yes, their ‘secretaries’) print their emails.”

David Burgess (editor of the Legal500 ) comments that: “A senior partner told me, to be honest, I don’t really understand all this, so I’ll focus on what I know“. Or “My law firm won an innovative award. The next day I rang it up to ask what new tech it was using. I was told – we don’t have anything, just a really good bid manager for the awards“.

The fortress mentality leads to regular slides at legal conferences and events (such as below, at Codex’s Future of Law) pointing to law as a paradigm of resistance (“The traditional law practice business model constrains innovation”, and “the legal profession’s resistance to chance hinders additional innovation”).

But legal winter is coming

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But winter is coming and there will be a distinction between those shaping the future and those managing the fortress. Consulting firm McKinsey shows 69% of time is potentially automatable for paralegals and 23% of time is automatable for lawyers.

In the shift to this new world, the  division between the innovators and wall-watchers will only become more stark.

The Iron Throne of Legal Innovation

Heralding a new dawn, however, we are seeing a new battle for innovation.This is being led by a new breed of lawyers, ripping up old ways of doing things simply based on the past.

One front of the battle to innovation is greater collaboration and sharing of legal and technological know how (as Jaime Lannister says: “we need allies. Stronger better allies. We cannot win this war alone”).

A second plank of the battle is a legal technological arms race. Companies including Microsoft, Cisco, Google and others are  overhauling their legal departments through innovation. JP Morgan has automated contracts it apparently took lawyers 360,000 hours to achieve. LawGeex provides One Hour Contract Approval through Artificial Intelligence, compared to the weeks it takes within most organizations. Other technology is being taken advantage of by legal teams, including legal research, to IP, to prediction technology (more than 100 legaltech providers are analyzed in our free In-House Counsels LegalTech Buyers Guide).

Thirdly, both the ACC and Corporate Legal Operations Institute (CLOC) have focused on  Legal Operations. 26% of general counsel delegated legal operations to an ops team or department, up from 16% last year. More than 1000 professionals in Las Vegas attended the Corporate Legal Operations Institute (CLOC) institute, vowing to smash down the wall of resistance.

In her closing address Mary Shen O’Carroll, Head of Legal Operations at Google, and head of CLOC : “It turned out that mindset, which felt so entrenched, could be changed. There’s a wall there and once you push on it, you can break through. And once broken, there’s no turning back. You realize those walls are paper thin and no one is trying to put them back up.”

Surviving the winter: moving from watchers to doers

Surviving the winter will mean leaving the wall and keeping fear at bay. In the words of Sterling Miller, former General Counsel of Travelocity and Sabre Corporation: “To  be a successful in-house lawyer or general counsel you need to embrace technology and make sure your team does as well.  So, if you are afraid of technology, you need to get past that.”

It is taking a new legal game plan to shift fear to strength. In the words of Arya Stark: “Fear Cuts Deeper than Swords“.

Or according to legal innovators, the path to the throne  of innovation will be building bridges with technology rather than protecting walls.

For more information or a LawGeex demo Get In Touch.

Jonathan Marciano, Communications Director at LawGeex, is  originally from London. He is  currently in Tel Aviv, helping to bring about the legal revolution. Follow him on Twitter. @J_Marciano